Home / Our Analyses / EU’s support for defence research discreetly gets off the mark

EU’s support for defence research discreetly gets off the mark

By BROOKS TIGNER, BRUSSELS – The EU’s ambitious plan to enter the field of defence research, with all that implies for policy and capability development, quietly shifted into gear in mid-April as the European Commission nailed down the plan’s legal and budgetary details, and its first year’s tendering intentions. The dual-use ramifications of this are significant, since nearly all of the defence research and development projects to be supported by the plan – and future EU spending in this arena – could be spun out to civil security applications as well.

Little noticed by the press, the decision was signed into law on 11 April by…

This content is for members only.
Log In Create an account

Check Also

EU leaders’ decisions augur big developments for European defence policy, with wider implications for other sectors as well

By PATRICK STEPHENSON and BROOKS TIGNER, BRUSSELS – After decades of procrastination, national leaders at their 22-23 June summit here took decisions that now set the stage for the EU’s entry into the defence field, though any talk of an imminent “European” army is fantasy. Nonetheless, important policy proposals by the European Commission were approved. The member states themselves finally agreed to finance their diverse battlegroups to boost the EU’s common security and defence policy (CSDP), for example, while approving plans – far more radical – to allow self-selected EU countries to shift into “permanent structured cooperation” (PESCO) in defence. But these were just some of the approved measures. An interesting coda to these decisions will be their impact on the EU’s...